RSS
The history of quilombos in Brazil is an important part of the history of black resistance within a racist society and A quilombo known as a maroon society in the United States or palenque in Spanish-speaking countries is a community formed by fugitive slaves seeking freedom the history and mythologies about the quilombo known as Palmares and it greatest leader Zumbi are still very much alive in the minds of the Afro-Brazilian community and numerous organizations across the culture are named after that famous quilombo or its legendary leader and Today 126 years after the official end of 350 years of slavery, descendants of those runaway societies still live on these lands Known as Comunidades Remanescentes de Quilombos (or Remnants of Quilombo Communities) according to the blog Negreiros Urbanos, many remnants of quilombo communities are in their territories maintaining the origins of those black men and women who rebelled fleeing from suffering that was imposed on them by a society that today has racism as institutional ingredient and We see quilombolas (quilombo inhabitants) still struggling to survive in precarious conditions in desolate places but that reflect a constant mark of resistance. In order to survive, they must resist farmers, landowners who, not satisfied with the lands that they have, sometimes stolen lands of poor and helpless people, try to invade the lands take away from the legitimacy of owning these lands from quilombolas Today 126 years after the official end of 350 years of slavery descendants of those runaway societies still live on these lands Known as Comunidades Remanescentes de Quilombos (or Remnants of Quilombo Communities) according to the blog Negreiros Urbanos many remnants of quilombo communities are in their territories maintaining the origins of those black men and women who rebelled fleeing from suffering that was imposed on them by a society that today has racism as institutional ingredient and We see quilombolas (quilombo inhabitants) still struggling to survive in precarious conditions in desolate places but that reflect a constant mark of resistance. In order to survive, they must resist farmers, landowners who, not satisfied with the lands that they have, sometimes stolen lands of poor and helpless people, try to invade the lands take away from the legitimacy of owning these lands from quilombolas 75% of quilombolas living in extreme poverty

The history of quilombos in Brazil is an important part of the history of black resistance within a racist society and A quilombo known as a maroon society in the United States or palenque in Spanish-speaking countries is a community formed by fugitive slaves seeking freedom the history and mythologies about the quilombo known as Palmares and it greatest leader Zumbi are still very much alive in the minds of the Afro-Brazilian community and numerous organizations across the culture are named after that famous quilombo or its legendary leader and Today 126 years after the official end of 350 years of slavery, descendants of those runaway societies still live on these lands Known as Comunidades Remanescentes de Quilombos (or Remnants of Quilombo Communities) according to the blog Negreiros Urbanos, many remnants of quilombo communities are in their territories maintaining the origins of those black men and women who rebelled fleeing from suffering that was imposed on them by a society that today has racism as institutional ingredient and We see quilombolas (quilombo inhabitants) still struggling to survive in precarious conditions in desolate places but that reflect a constant mark of resistance. In order to survive, they must resist farmers, landowners who, not satisfied with the lands that they have, sometimes stolen lands of poor and helpless people, try to invade the lands take away from the legitimacy of owning these lands from quilombolas Today 126 years after the official end of 350 years of slavery descendants of those runaway societies still live on these lands Known as Comunidades Remanescentes de Quilombos (or Remnants of Quilombo Communities) according to the blog Negreiros Urbanos many remnants of quilombo communities are in their territories maintaining the origins of those black men and women who rebelled fleeing from suffering that was imposed on them by a society that today has racism as institutional ingredient and We see quilombolas (quilombo inhabitants) still struggling to survive in precarious conditions in desolate places but that reflect a constant mark of resistance. In order to survive, they must resist farmers, landowners who, not satisfied with the lands that they have, sometimes stolen lands of poor and helpless people, try to invade the lands take away from the legitimacy of owning these lands from quilombolas 75% of quilombolas living in extreme poverty

why do ppl assume attractive black girls have to be mixed :/

Anonymous

(Source: cartoonistgroup.com)


The first mention of the name Azania with a South African connection appeared in the 1930s archaeological reports of excavations at Mapungubwe in the northern Transvaal and The skeletal remains were referred to as ancient Azanians and The term is currently used by some political movements in South Africa influenced by black nationalism, including the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) of Azania, the Azanian People’s Organisation, the Socialist Party of Azania and associated organisations

The first mention of the name Azania with a South African connection appeared in the 1930s archaeological reports of excavations at Mapungubwe in the northern Transvaal and The skeletal remains were referred to as ancient Azanians and The term is currently used by some political movements in South Africa influenced by black nationalism, including the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC) of Azania, the Azanian People’s Organisation, the Socialist Party of Azania and associated organisations


The history books from the true African historians don’t lie. Boycott this crap at all cost

The history books from the true African historians don’t lie. Boycott this crap at all cost

Pan Africanism new Generation must focus on our vision as laid down by Pan Africanist giants such as Sobukwe, Mothopeng, Nkrumah, Lumumba and Sekou Toure We must have the will to succeed and the will to serve our organisation and people with distinction amidst confusion and conspiracies which border on political treachery and lunacy Those who want to bring radical changes that benefit the poor and the powerless

Pan Africanism new Generation must focus on our vision as laid down by Pan Africanist giants such as Sobukwe, Mothopeng, Nkrumah, Lumumba and Sekou Toure We must have the will to succeed and the will to serve our organisation and people with distinction amidst confusion and conspiracies which border on political treachery and lunacy Those who want to bring radical changes that benefit the poor and the powerless

What inspired you to make Brenda’s Got A Baby?"I was reading the New York Post when I was doing the movie Juice and it was this story - it started out to be this big story about this family who died because they didn’t have heat and they left the gas on. Everybody died except for this girl who moved in with her cousin. (Second cousin.) She started dating her second cousin. He got her pregnant. Nobody knew that she was pregnant, and I was like "dag!" And it was over a week, but the story kept getting smaller and smaller and smaller. And I was like, "This is very important. More important than Juice, to me! It was a bigger story than Juice!And right now, nobody talks about that. No young black male… No black males talk about black females like we should. We need to take more responsibilities for our sisters because if we don’t, who will? Because…”"If you look at it now, black females are held lower of the totem pole than anybody."- Tupac 

What inspired you to make Brenda’s Got A Baby?

"I was reading the New York Post when I was doing the movie Juice and it was this story - it started out to be this big story about this family who died because they didn’t have heat and they left the gas on. Everybody died except for this girl who moved in with her cousin. (Second cousin.) She started dating her second cousin. He got her pregnant. Nobody knew that she was pregnant, and I was like "dag!" And it was over a week, but the story kept getting smaller and smaller and smaller. And I was like, "This is very important. More important than Juice, to me! It was a bigger story than Juice!
And right now, nobody talks about that. No young black male… No black males talk about black females like we should. We need to take more responsibilities for our sisters because if we don’t, who will? Because…”

"If you look at it now, black females are held lower of the totem pole than anybody."

- Tupac 

(Source: fucklife954)